Apple Watch as a Capable Event Assistant

A few weeks ago, Darrell Etherington published a piece on Techcrunch about his experiences using the Apple Watch at Techcrunch Disrupt NY 2015. I haven’t placed my order for the Apple Watch yet, but when I talk about my intent to do so, most people ask why. There’s still a lot of questions out there about what the Watch can do.

Apple WatchEtherington gives a strong plug for the Apple Watch as an assistant that helps you stay focused on attention-grabbing work tasks, while alerting you to incoming work requests that can’t be missed. At the same time, it helps you stay connected to loved ones, even in the midst of your hectic schedule.

Etherington likes the Watch’s notifications, because they break through all the noise to get his attention. He can respond to the notifications quickly, such as by initiating a “Like” for a comment on Convo, an enterprise social networking app used by his co-workers. The like let’s the sender know that he’s seen the request and acknowledges it.

Even in the midst of the Disrupt event chaos, Apple Watch helps Etherington stay in touch with loved ones by allowing him to quickly send sketches, taps and heartbeats. These communication forms are more personalized and even quicker than stopping to exchange text messages.

The Apple Watch seems to be the perfect platform for those micro-moments that Jeffrey Hammond of Forrester Research writes about. Micro-moments are unprompted alerts or nudges from mobile apps that provide useful information and that are quick for the recipient to interact with or dismiss.

Micro-moments, comprised of helpful notifications that assist us through the challenges of our busy lives, are likely to become valuable features of our wearables. As products like the Apple Watch become increasingly adept at keeping us on track, the distinction between typical wearable apps and what we think of today as personal intelligent assistants may start to blur.

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